Infographic: surviving the tech-challenged public

IT service professionals have to deal with questions from customers that cover the entire spectrum of technical knowledge. Many IT agents have been asked questions that are very simple or completely absurd, especially when compared to the deeply technical questions they might receive on the very next call.

As our latest infographic shows, a little bit of professionalism, composure, and a sense of humor can go a long way in ensuring that you provide the same level of IT support to all of your customers.

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Surviving the tech-challenged public infographic

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  • http://twitter.com/techandi Tech Andi

    Here is the problem: the starting point is assuming a call from a ‘tech-challenged person’. This sets the scene for a wrong mindset of an IT Service Professional. Way to often I hear support personnel talking about ‘stupid’ users. Believe it or not: (1) often the user calling might actually know more then the support person; and (2) the advice from this info-graphic is good and applicable to any type of a caller, whether a tech-challenged one or the one knowing more then the support person but in need for help (as, perhaps  there are things s/he cannot do without certain privileges… or to report a bug.. or whatever the reason might be). 

  • computernerd

    how about “when i move my mouse up on the screen it moves down” … because you’re holding the mouse upside down … or after remoting into someones computer you ask them why they have so many windows open and they reply “because its hot outside today” … i know computers might not be common sense but there should be an expected level of competency for a job.